Posts tagged as 'directing'

The Anatomy of Directing: The Throat (Forward & Up, Part 2)

The Anatomy of Directing: The Throat (Forward & Up, Part 2)

In books on movement and anatomy, the throat is often overlooked because it is not considered to be part of the movement system. But we must remember that, as part of the flexor sheet on the front of the body, the throat is involved in many everyday movements, not to mention speech. And because it is connected with head balance, it also profoundly affects the larger movement system and comes into play as we direct, which is why we have to know something about how it works…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Skull & Atlas

The Anatomy of Directing: Skull & Atlas

The most important cervical vertebra is the very first one, called the “atlas” because, it supports the globe of the head as the Greek titan Atlas supported the Earth on his shoulders. 1d-Atlanto-occipitalThe atlas vertebrae forms a joint with the base of the skull called the atlanto-occipital (or AO) joint, where two bumps on the base of the skull sit nicely in two concave depressions on the atlas. We nod our heads by articulating at this point…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Introduction

The Anatomy of Directing: Introduction

A key principle of neurodynamics is the recognition that the muscular system is dynamically organized according to the relation of body parts. In this series, which was written as part of the Da Vinci Project and acts as an addendum to the book on neurodynamics, we will look at some of the key elements of our anatomy as it relates to directing and then apply this knowledge with some practical exercises, beginning with the back, spine, and head.

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Kinesthetic Thinking: Thoughts on Directing from “Neurodynamics”

Kinesthetic Thinking: Thoughts on Directing from “Neurodynamics”

What does it mean to “think” the directions? When we conceive of muscle activity, or the ability to influence muscle tone, we normally think in terms of actions- like raising the arm- that produce a definite contraction, or tensing, of the muscle. Being asked to simply “think” of allowing the head to go forward and up seems, in contrast, vague and intangible…

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