Posts tagged as 'da-vinci-project'

The Anatomy of Directing: Forward & Up

The Anatomy of Directing: Forward & Up

Now that we’ve identified some the key anatomical landmarks and their role in directing, let’s look at the directions for the head: forward and up. These directions are key to establishing the correct working of the primary control, and often cause particular difficulty for students because of their nuance. In a general way, we know that “forward and up” of the head means that we don’t want to pull the head back and down. But why do we use these words, and what exactly do we mean by them…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Front Length

The Anatomy of Directing: Front Length

One of the most important features of our human anatomical design is our front length. When the first hominids reared up on their hind limbs to become fully upright, everything suspended below the spine- the guts, rib cage, etc- now hung out in front of the spine. This means that we are not evenly balanced front-to-back. This places the onus of support on our back muscles (the extensors) to keep us standing, and they can work properly only when the whole system is lengthening and the back muscles are doing their job in this context…

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The Anatomy of Directing: The Hip Joints

The Anatomy of Directing: The Hip Joints

When asked where the hip joints are located, many people point to the pelvic bones—the big, bony rim along the top of your pelvis that forms your waist. Technically speaking, twhere is the hip?hese are not your hips but the crest of the pelvic or iliac bones; the word “hip,” as any doctor will tell you, refers not to the iliac crest but to the hip joint…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Skull & Atlas

The Anatomy of Directing: Skull & Atlas

The most important cervical vertebra is the very first one, called the “atlas” because, it supports the globe of the head as the Greek titan Atlas supported the Earth on his shoulders. 1d-Atlanto-occipitalThe atlas vertebrae forms a joint with the base of the skull called the atlanto-occipital (or AO) joint, where two bumps on the base of the skull sit nicely in two concave depressions on the atlas. We nod our heads by articulating at this point…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Spine & Back

The Anatomy of Directing: Spine & Back

Most of us are aware of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar curves of the spine (the articulated vertebrae that make up the bendable parts of the spine), but we sometimes forget that, where it attaches to the pelvis at its bottom end, the spine forms a fourth curve. What this means is that the spine and back do not end at the lumbar or waist region but include the entire bottom end of the sacrum and pelvis…

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The Anatomy of Directing: Introduction

The Anatomy of Directing: Introduction

A key principle of neurodynamics is the recognition that the muscular system is dynamically organized according to the relation of body parts. In this series, which was written as part of the Da Vinci Project and acts as an addendum to the book on neurodynamics, we will look at some of the key elements of our anatomy as it relates to directing and then apply this knowledge with some practical exercises, beginning with the back, spine, and head.

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