Posts tagged as 'da-vinci-project'

The Anatomy of Directing: Conclusion

The Anatomy of Directing: Conclusion

Thanks for following along with our Anatomy of Directing series; we hope you found it useful. If you’ve missed some of the posts, you can find them all here. Anyone wishing to better understand how to put the principles of neurodynamics into practice will benefit from a foundational knowledge of anatomy and design….

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The Anatomy of Directing: Leg Spiral Exercise

The Anatomy of Directing: Leg Spiral Exercise

In our last Anatomy of Directing post, we walked through a few simple knee directing exercises. We also spoke about the leg spirals, and this week, we’d like add one additional exercise that specifically accesses the spirals…

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THE ANATOMY OF DIRECTING: The Knees & Leg Spirals

THE ANATOMY OF DIRECTING: The Knees & Leg Spirals

The directions for the knees to go forward and away seems simple enough, at one level. We tighten in the hips and legs and need to release those muscles to let the knees go away from the body (that’s the “forward”) and away from each other (that’s the “away”). And because we are speaking here about an extremity that is associated with visible and voluntary movement, there is no difficulty in identifying where the knees are and where they need to go. The tricky part is that most of us are not aware of how much we tighten and shorten in the hips and legs…

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The Anatomy of Directing: the Arms & Shoulder

The Anatomy of Directing: the Arms & Shoulder

The shoulder girdle acts as a kind of cross-piece for supporting the arms, which are levers for moving the hand. Because the chest is rather wide, we might assume that the rib cage is wide at the shoulders as well, and that the shoulders somehow hang from the rib cage. Surprisingly, the upper rib cage is very narrow, and it is the shoulder girdle itself, and all the muscles attaching to the shoulder girdle and upper arm, that give breadth to the upper torso…

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The Anatomy of Directing: The Throat (Forward & Up, Part 2)

The Anatomy of Directing: The Throat (Forward & Up, Part 2)

In books on movement and anatomy, the throat is often overlooked because it is not considered to be part of the movement system. But we must remember that, as part of the flexor sheet on the front of the body, the throat is involved in many everyday movements, not to mention speech. And because it is connected with head balance, it also profoundly affects the larger movement system and comes into play as we direct, which is why we have to know something about how it works…

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